Course Catalog

Core Course

  • Introduces the concepts and objectives underlying the preparation of financial statements. Topics include understanding the accounting cycle, measurement and valuation problems associated with financial statement components, consideration of the usefulness of financial statements in the analysis of a corporation’s operations.

  • Examines basic psychological and social psychological processes shaping human behavior and applies knowledge of these processes to the problem of working with and managing others in organizations. Topics include: motivation, job design, commitment, socialization, culture, individual and group decision making and team building.

  • Strategic management of organizations, including analysis of industries, firm resources and capabilities and corporate strategy. Strategy formulation, implementation and strategic decision-making. Firm and industry life cycles and change. Analysis of organizational design and structure including differentiation and integration.

  • Examines the decisions of consumers, business and government, and how these players interact. This course covers a variety of topics in economics, including supply and demand, efficiency, pricing and game theory. We will also cover the use and interpretation of economic data, and the rationale and effects of government policies affecting business. Fundamental concepts such as marginal analysis, opportunity cost, economies of scale and external effects are applied to current examples, in particular in the area of information technology

  • Introduces statistics and data analysis for managerial decision making. Descriptive statistics, principles of data collection, sampling, quality control, statistical inference. Application of data-analytic methods to problems in marketing, finance, accounting, production, operations and public policy.

  • Teaches a systematic approach to developing a sound marketing plan. Considers the business mission; situation analysis; strategy formulation; development and implementation of product, pricing, communication and distribution policies; and ethical issues facing marketing managers.

  • Covers the fundamental principles of corporate financial management and capital markets. Major topics include general valuation methods for risky cash flow streams, capital budgeting, asset pricing models, risk management, equity financing, debt financing, and dividend policy.

  • Explores operations in manufacturing and service sectors from both inside and outside a company. Quantitative methods and their organizational implications are also examined.

  • Develop competency in business writing and oral presentations. Build critical thinking skills. Topics include behavioral economics, false claims, deductive reasoning, correlation/causality, business ethics.

  • Course applies classroom learning to solve complex business challenges for real world clients. Student teams learn practical consulting skills while their clients benefit from the student’s experience, insights, and work product.

    Prerequisite: Must complete core couses by the start of this course

  • Course applies classroom learning to solve complex business challenges for real world clients. Student teams learn practical consulting skills while their clients benefit from the student’s experience, insights, and work product.

    Prerequisite: Must complete core courses by the start of this course

Elective

  • Focuses on the use of accounting information for better managerial decision-making and creating value for organizations. Topics include product costing, cost allocation, incremental analysis, budgeting, variance analysis, and performance evaluation. Methods for learning include: lectures, problem-solving, case presentations and discussion.

  • Coverage includes the fundamentals of accounting and reporting economic events and transactions. The course emphasizes the preparation of balance sheets, income statements, statements of cash flow, and statements of stockholders’ equity.

    Prerequisite: Must be admitted into the Masters of Professional Accountancy Program. Not open for credit to students who have completed Management 200A

  • Examines the influence of government and international factors on the business environment. Topics include business cycles, inflation and interest rates, the federal debt, monetary policy and international trade and finance.

  • Focuses on the Preparation of complex financial statements. Topics include accounting recognition, measurement, and disclosure, as well as the theoretical foundations of and motivations for financial reporting choices. Examines the standard setting process and the effects of international standards.

    Prerequisite: Must be admitted into the Masters of Professional Accountancy Program; ACC 201 or MGT 200A

  • Introduces modern and practical statistical methods for managerial decision-making. Topics include regression analysis, time series analysis and forecasting, design and analysis of experiments in managerial research and contingency table analysis. Applications of these methods include marketing, finance, accounting, production, operations, and public policy. Case studies and examples of computer-aided analysis are provided to illustrate various applications.

    Prerequisite: 203A

  • An advanced treatment of recognition, measurement, and disclosure including pensions, accounting for income taxes, mergers and acquisitions, consolidations, special-purpose entities, and foreign subsidiaries. Also includes accounting for governmental and nonprofit entities, as well as advanced treatment of international accounting standards.

    Prerequisite: Must be admitted into the Masters of Professional Accountancy Program; ACC 203

  • Considers management science for decision makers. Topics include an introduction to modeling and decision analysis, an introduction to optimization and linear programming, modeling and solving linear programming problems in a spread sheet, sensitivity analysis and the simplex method, networks, integer linear programming, project management and decision analysis.

  • Information technologies are pervasive, and transform what they touch. This course covers questions such as: What technologies are critical to operations, marketing, decision making and e-business activities? How has the role of technology changed over time, and what factors govern the choice of IT applications? How does IT influence business strategy, and strategy in other areas such as marketing and operations? What are the key challenges in managing IT resources, and what factors limit business’ ability to exploit the latest information

  • An introduction to the taxation of business entities and their related transactions, with an emphasis on the details of tax law and tax reporting requirements. Topics include individual, partnership, and corporate taxation, as well as tax theory.

    Prerequisite: Must be admitted into the Masters of Professional Accountancy Program. Not open for credit to students who have completed Management 264.

  • Detailed analysis of federal taxation of individuals. Topics include the timing of income recognition, deductions and credits for tax purposes, as well as the basics of property transactions.

    Prerequisite: Must be admitted into the Masters of Professional Accountancy Program; ACC 211 or Management 264

  • Advanced treatment of complex tax transactions and entities. Topics include aspects of federal taxation of entities and the applicable impact upon individual taxpayers.  Coverage includes basis analysis as applicable to pass through entities and an introduction to professional responsibilities.

    Prerequisite: Must be admitted into the Masters of Professional Accountancy Program; ACC 213

  • Covers the study of the legal environment of business. Subject matter includes an introduction to the American legal system, legal reasoning, contracts, agency, business organizations, and government regulation. Provides students with a basic understanding of the significant legal issues that confront managers and executives.

  • Most social scientists define power as “the capacity to get what you want over the resistance of others” and influence as “the translation of power into action”.  Power and Influence in Management examines the bases of subunit and individual power in organizations and the means by which subunit and individual power is translated into influence.  The course assumes that leaders sometimes must acquire power to be effective, but recognizes that leaders do not always use power in the interests of the organization.  Thus, the course explores the positive and negative effects that

  • Explore the different choices firm make in governing and managing their workers–decisions as to wages, benefits, working conditions, ways of organizing work, and other management policies and practices. Analyze employment systems fit with firms environments and strategies, and the consequences of choices managers make regarding policies and practices.

    Prerequisite: 201A

  • Modern systems for managing people. Examination of the changing workforce and workplace, emphasizing high-technology and knowledge-intensive organizations. The impact of firms’ environment (competition, product market, regulations) on choices for managing people. The consequences of these choices for firms and managers.

  • Evaluation of complex financial accounting reports by managers and persons outside the firm, such as investors, creditors, and financial analysts. Topics include cash flow vs. income measurement, ratio and valuation analysis, and the effects of international accounting standards.

    Prerequisite: Must be admitted into the Masters of Professional Accountancy Program; ACC 203. Not open for credit to students who have completed Management 272

  • Presents concepts and tools that are useful when making pricing decisions. Topics include cost analysis, demand and the factors that influence it, pricing in competitive environments, product line pricing, bundling, international pricing, quantity dependent pricing, and pricing in the Internet environment.

  • Introduction to the audit environment, professional standards, the accounting profession, and the professional responsibilities of accountants. The course will integrate audit topics across the areas of financial, cost, tax and systems accounting.

    Prerequisite: Must be admitted into the Masters of Professional Accountancy Program; ACC 201 or Management 200A (may be taken concurrently).

  • Why do some companies consistently outperform other companies in developing successful new products and services? Why do so many new products fail in the marketplace? This course introduces students to the major activities involved in developing new products and services. Emphasis is on learning practical skills and techniques that can help students be successful in a product development environment.

  • Advanced treatment of the audit process and environment. Topics include audit planning and performance, evidence, internal controls, professional standards, and audit reports. Reviews, compilations and attestation services are examined, as are governmental agency audits.

    Prerequisite: Must be admitted into the Masters of Professional Accountancy Program; ACC 241

  • Customer Relationship Management (CRM) is a management approach under which marketing activities are organized and measured around customers instead of brands. This approach benefits firms as customers and not brands make buying decisions. Applications of CRM range from creating better customer segments, understanding customer profitability to complete one-to-one marketing programs.

  • Emphasizes starting a new business venture or managing a small business during its formative stages. Topics include entrepreneurship, legal issues, financing the business, marketing research and the management team. Small teams of students develop a detailed business plan for a potential new venture.

  • This course is designed to help students develop the ability to effectively negotiate in a competitive business environment. It focuses on negotiation skill-building in the areas of individual conflict management, team management, performance appraisal, corporate impression management and inter-organizational project management.The course will be taught largely through in-class simulations to provide an opportunity for experiential learning.The simulations will also allow students to develop a personal style of negotiation by discovering what works best for them in different situations.

  • Covers strategic marketing decisions, those that have a long-term impact on the organization and are difficult and costly to reverse. These include selecting product markets and customers; developing and communicating main benefit propositions for the chosen customers, including product features, quality, services; and developing competitive and cooperative strategies to successfully market products and services. The focus will be on the entire decision-making process, which starts by collecting and analyzing information about the external and internal environment of the organization.

  • Course addresses the managerial issues and problems of systematically gathering and analyzing information for making private and public marketing decisions. Covers the cost and value of information, research design, information collection, measuring instruments, data analysis, and marketing research applications.

  • This course helps you understand business strategies for firms that make technology products, those that feature digital components and network effects. Technology products face distinctive demand-side economic forces (e.g., how value is created) and supply-side forces (e.g., cost structures) which lead to distinctive outcomes and competitive strategies. You will learn from phenomenon and strategies such as: Why do firms in the IT industry give away their best products free? Why is it always ladies-night free (and not men’s) in nightclubs? Why is software typically so defective?

  • This course focuses on the management of technology-based innovation. Topics include the impact of new technologies on industries, dominant designs, incremental and transformative innovations, and the life-cycle of products. The course will examine the organization of highly innovative firms, and the relationship of core competencies to both innovation and rigidity. Cases and field studies are used to address the relationship of innovation to management practices such as leadership, competitive strategic planning and teamwork. Students perform an innovation audit of an area firm.

  • An analysis of management accounting systems including cost accounting, performance measurement, and compensation and reward systems. The course focuses on the production of information useful for managerial decision-making, as well as the design of these systems.

    Prerequisite: Must be admitted into the Masters of Professional Accountancy Program; ACC 201 or Management 200A (may be taken concurrently)Not open for credit to students who have completed Management 271

  • Bridges the gap between concepts in corporate finance learned in Management 205 and corporate finance as it is currently applied by top management of U.S. firms. Questions to be addressed: Do managers practice what MBA programs teach? If not, why not? Which theories that MBAs have learned are recognized by managers? Which theories seem to fit the facts best? The course is highly recommended for students interested in corporate or nonprofit finance.

    Prerequisite: 202A

  • An overview of written and oral professional communications with an emphasis on structuring and documenting audits and reports, understanding audiences (investors, creditors, regulators, and other stakeholders), and consideration of ethical and regulatory responsibilities.

    Prerequisite: Must be admitted into the Masters of Professional Accountancy Program; ACC 201 or Management 200A (may be taken concurrently)

  • Examines models of asset pricing and the actual performance of U.S. and foreign investments, with an emphasis on equity investments. The course considers the factors affecting stock and bond returns, the success of different investment strategies, and the ability of individual investors and institutional players to “beat the market.” Other topics include diversification, market crashes, fixed-income analysis, the organization and performance of mutual funds.

  • The behavior of options, futures and other derivative securities markets and how public agencies, business and others use those markets. Trading strategies involving options, swaps, and financial futures contracts. Pricing of derivative securities, primarily by arbitrage methods.

  • Develops and applies a framework for analyzing how income taxes affect business decisions and company strategy. Applications include the role of taxes in management compensation, multinational decision making, corporate restructuring transactions and succession planning. Emphasizes tax planning concepts and their application rather than the detail of the federal code.

  • This course examines VC finance and the related practice of R&D finance. The goal of the course is to apply finance tools and framework to the world of venture capital and financing of projects in high-growth industries.

  • Studies fixed and floating exchange-rate systems. Topics include determinants of a nation’s balance of international payments; macroeconomic interdependence of nations under various exchange-rate regimes and its implications for domestic stabilization policies; and the international coordination of monetary and stabilization policies.

  • This course teaches the theory and processes of group and team behavior so that you can successfully manage groups and work effectively in a variety of group settings. The first goal of the course is to provide conceptual guidelines for analyzing and diagnosing group dynamics and determining one’s strategic options as a manager. The second goal is to understand how technological change affects team processes in organizations. Finally, this course will impart practical interpersonal skills for implementing effective strategies for group situations.

  • Develop competency in business writing and oral presentations. Build critical thinking skills. Topics include behavioral economics, false claims, deductive and inductive reasoning, correlation/causality, business ethics.Formerly titled “Management Communications”. Course name/description change under review by Academic Senate.

  • Data are a key source of intelligence and competitive advantage for business organizations. With the explosion of electronic data available to organizations and demand for better and faster decisions, the role of data-driven intelligence is becoming central.

  • Critically analyzes and evaluates contemporary issues in corporate accounting and financial reporting, and develops implications of those issues for managers, investors, independent accountants, and policy makers. Focuses on the underlying accounting concepts and the motivations for and consequences of accounting and disclosure alternatives. Discusses research findings and legal implications where relevant. Covers generally accepted accounting principles for industrials, banks, and other organizations.

  • Analysis of accountants’ professional responsibilities and ethics. Topics include the behavioral foundations of ethics in a business environment, as well as how those elements affect accountants’ integrity, objectivity, and independence. Professional standards related to accountants’ conduct are also covered.

    Prerequisite: Must be admitted into the Masters of Professional Accountancy Program; ACC 201 or Management 200A (may be taken concurrently)

  • This class examines how firms use organizational design and cost management to achieve a sustainable cost structure as a basis for superior profit performance. A value chain framework is used to explore how firms design and structure business processes for strategic advantage. We start with an overview of how modern product costing systems work and their limitations as a basis for strategic cost management. We then study how firms manage costs during product design and development, production and/or service delivery, and after the sale.

  • Evaluates the information in financial reports of business enterprises, with an emphasis on the uses of financial statements by business managers and persons outside the firm, such as investors, creditors and financial analysts. Studies U.S. and U.K. enterprises. Covers techniques of financial analysis, evaluation of the quality of financial data, prediction of financial variables, cash flow and accounting valuation models, analysis of significant transactions, stock market effects of accounting information. 270 recommended.

  • Concentrates on the role of the independent public accountant as auditor, consultant and manager. Auditing standards, auditing procedures, professional ethics and internal control techniques are discussed. Emphasizes current issues confronting the accounting profession.

  • Concentrates on the role of the independent public accountant as auditor, consultant and manager. Auditing standards, auditing procedures, professional ethics and internal control techniques are discussed. Emphasizes current issues confronting the accounting profession.

  • Focuses on single-family, attached, detached, multi-family, and light commercial development. Studies factors that make up successful real estate developments. Considers the financial aspects of land acquisition, land development, construction, project lending and management. The course will have special lectures on Wetlands and the political process, forces, moratoriums and controls. Focuses on single-family, attached, detached, multi-family, and light commercial development. Studies factors that make up successful real estate developments.

  • Matching supply with demand is a primary challenge for a firm: excess supply is too costly, inadequate supply irritates customers. Matching supply to demand is easiest when a firm has a flexible supply process, but flexibility is generally expensive. In this course we will learn(1) how to assess the appropriate level of supply flexibility for a given industry and (2) explore strategies for economically increasing a firm’s supply flexibility. Lastly we will study coordination and incentives across multiple firms in a supply chain.

  • Helps managers face problems of forecasting the future value of external and internal factors such as product demand, input prices, inventory levels, interest rates, advertising budgets, etc. Covers techniques to aid in this task, including time series analysis, which is the statistical analysis of past data series to produce forecasts for future values of the series. Covers methods such as exponential smoothing, Box-Jenkins modeling, seasonal adjustment, decomposition, curve fitting and multiple regression.

  • Helps managers face problems of forecasting the future value of external and internal factors such as product demand, input prices, inventory levels, interest rates, advertising budgets, etc. Covers techniques to aid in this task, including time series analysis, which is the statistical analysis of past data series to produce forecasts for future values of the series.

  • Hierarchical, network, and relational models for database systems. Design and implementation of models. Performance evaluation and benchmarking. Query structures and languages. Data security and integrity. Application to managerial decision making and decision support systems.

  • This seminar brings successful corporate leaders to the Bay Area MBA program to teach important lessons from the frontlines of industry. Executives share their first-hand experiences of the complexities of today’s business world, inspiring students to seek new ways to meet the challenges of tomorrow.

  • Provides the necessary analytical and design tools to create and evaluate business ideas and refine potential business models based on emerging technologies. Students learn to work closely in small, interdisciplinary teams to synthesize technical, strategic, and marketing needs and resources into designs for new ventures. Topics include rapid market research, financial modeling, prototyping, and resource acquisition. Throughout the course, students will work in teams to develop and refine a set of new venture concepts, culminating with a well-developed venture pitch.

  • This course examines how energy is transformed into useful services, and then how to deliver the same services with less energy. Plenty of real-world examples will complement theories and generic approaches. Students may emerge from this course with the tools to professionally evaluate efficiency opportunities. The course may prepare students for careers in one of the most vibrant sectors of California’s (and the world’s) economy, including positions in utilities, energy service companies, and management of energy-intensive activities in a wide range of enterprises.

  • In this dynamic world businesses need to continuously change to deliver new services to customers, reduce costs of existing services or create an entirely new paradigm of business itself. Getting such changes implemented is a challenge. There are several cases where companies fail to achieve the desired change! They fail to get acceptance, they fail to get adoption and their grand vision remains unfulfilled.

  • This course will explore the intersections between Leadership, Innovation and Enterprise Culture. The perspective from which this course was designed was that of a company board member, a venture investor, an equity investor and an observer of business leaders from the inside over a career of forty years. These vantage points have informed the development of this course. The principal questions addressed revolve around what makes the leader of an enterprise successful over the long term?…what are the characteristics of these leaders?…what do these leaders do?

  • Course description varies with instructor

    About the Robert A. Fox Executive-in-Residence Program:

  • This course examines energy efficiency as a strategic solution to corporate financial, competitive, and sustainability goals. The course covers three topics: 1. energy fundamentals for non-experts, 2. corporate strategies for reducing energy consumption, and 3. energy efficiency as a new market opportunity. Although there will be some technical materials this is a strategy course and does not presume expertise in energy nor the intention of entering the energy industry.

  • This course explores the opportunities, challenges, and rewards offered by businesses that engage in creating environmentally sustainable products, services, and markets. Students will gain an in-depth understanding of the clean tech sector, specifically focusing on renewable energy, green building, organic and natural products, and smart grids.Topics include environmental challenges to business, finding and presenting sustainable venture opportunities, market failure, and stakeholder engagement.

  • This class is for students who want to better understand the relationship between politics and business.  Students of this class will be better prepared to understand business as a political actor, the regulation of business by government, business participation in the policy making process, and constraints on business as a political power, among other topics.  Students taking this class will hopefully be better prepared to help manage their organization through the policy and political landscape in a manner that is advantageous to their business.

  • This course will focus on effective strategies for leading and managing companies. CEOs and business leaders are scheduled to speak in class and share their experiences in leadership. The course will include strategies and tools applicable for managers at all organizational levels.

  • “The Causes of Organizational Wrongdoing” is motivated by the implicit contradiction between two personal observations. My experience suggests that the overwhelming majority of managers (and management students) aspire to manage in ethical, socially responsible, and law-abiding ways and embrace socially acceptable ideas about the difference between right and wrong. But media reports and academic studies suggest that unethical, socially irresponsible, and illegal behavior is common in organizations.

  • Social entrepreneurship is a rapidly developing and changing business field in which business and nonprofit leaders design, grow, and lead mission-driven enterprises. As the traditional lines blur between nonprofit enterprises, government, and business, it is critical that business students understand the opportunities and challenges in this new landscape. Through guest speakers, case discussion, lecture, and student presentations this course will explore this emerging field. Students will be expected to develop a business plan for a social enterprise.

  • This course is designed to facilitate mastery of the core skills required of real estate professionals, be they developers, financiers, brokers, investment managers, etc. Each position requires the ability to think critically about valuation and the elements used in its construction. The class helps develop this faculty by exercising the student’s analytical abilities in a number of different contexts.

  • This course will analyze the role of financial markets and financial institutions in allocating debt capital. The major focus will be on bank lending, debt securities and on innovations in the financial markets. The functions of commercial banks, investment banks, and other financial intermediaries will be covered, and aspects of the regulation of these institutions will be examined. Real world case studies and guest speakers representing various elements of the financial system will be integral components of this course and help evaluate the gaps between theory and reality.

  • Mergers and acquisitions are an important part of economic activity and a key element of corporate finance and strategy.  This course will focus on issues related to the market for corporate acquisitions and on restructuring activity.

  • Consumers and customers (current consumers/customers and prospects) are the focus of all marketing activity. Starting with this simple proposition, this course examines a wide range of behavioral science concepts and their application to marketing situations,the cognitive, affective, and behavioral responses of consumers to products and services, and to the marketing of those products and services. Significant attention will be paid to how B2C consumers and B2B customers make decisions, and how marketers can influence those decisions.

  • The course is designed to equip students for a career in digital marketing and social media. The topics covered will include online advertising, search engine optimization, interactive marketing, online privacy issues, e-commerce, social influence, social network theory, measurement of social influence, and integrating social media with traditional media.

  • The course is designed to provide an in-depth understanding of the requirements, issues, and tools involved in marketing existing products/services. The major topic areas covered include: The product management system, market planning, and control. Unifying and integrating marketing concepts from the core and the marketing electives (through the use of a marketing simulation).

  • This class is designed to help develop knowledge, skills and desire to do business in the international marketplace. Each time, we pick a new part of the world to study that reflects some special opportunity. The course will begin with discussion of importance of international business and theory of Comparative Advantage and the continued trend towards globalization.

  • Prerequisite: consent of instructor. (S/U grading only.)

  • Prerequisite: consent of instructor. (S/U grading only.)

  • This is a short course which moves usefully beyond 101. It operates at both a strategic and a highly practical level, and students will become confident in toggling between the two, learning to anchor crisis management firmly within overall strategic management, yet simultaneously acquiring a set of useful, practical tools and techniques to be used in planning for possible crises, and in handling actualities in the moment. The course will be based on the excellent required text, which is accessible, engaging and remarkably up to date, and contains many good case studies.

  • This course is intended to provide you with an understanding of the framework and tools necessary to successfully address communications and reputation management tasks in a variety of crisis situations. Through discussion and application of theory, as well as analysis of case studies, you’ll be asked to think strategically, make recommendations to address crisis-related challenges, and develop robust, proactive plans to assist organizations in this arena.

  • In this dynamic world businesses need to continuously change to deliver new services to customers, reduce costs of existing services or create an entirely new paradigm of business itself. Getting such changes implemented is a challenge. There are several cases where companies fail to achieve the desired change! They fail to get acceptance, they fail to get adoption and their grand vision remains unfulfilled.

  • This course enhances understanding of business concepts by reading “classic” business literature, discussing the readings and writing about the readings.

  • This course explores the philosophical foundation of ethical theory and its recent applications to business situations. Professional codes of ethics, such as those promulgated by educational, managerial, engineering, scientific, medical and legal professional societies, are presented. Corporate policies relating to ethical concerns are illustrated as well. The application of ethical theory to ethical audits in the workplace concludes the lecture part of the course. Student teams of two or three are organized to present ethical tradeoff issues such as: workplace safety vs.

  • Internalize the fundamental principles behind stories that educate, influence, motivate, inspire, persuade, and connect.

     

  • Focuses on the media industries and how emerging digital technologies are disrupting the way media consumption, distribution and business models work. Course will highlight the economics of several media- both news and entertainment – including newspapers, magazines, radio, television, cable television, motion pictures, video gaming, and social media. The course will include guest speakers from the different media industries studied, highlight innovative start-ups through case studies.

  • This course focuses on top down management of alternative investment and multi-asset class portfolios.  Students may gain a general understanding of the qualitative investment attributes and quantitative performance drivers of the following types of portfolios:  bonds, hedge funds, private equity, real estate commodity, and university endowments.  Class time may include discussions of actual investment and strategy recommendations (both successful and unsuccessful) made by their instructor during his career as a professional investment manager.  

  • Covers recent and not-so-recent business and accounting scandals, discusses how corporations can better operate in the interests of shareholders, and the public and learn from people who rely on corporate governance in making investment decisions.

  • This course will teach students how to evaluate the financial performance of a company, identify opportunities for improvement, propose real solutions to enhance performance, and most important inspire action in staff. This two day elective course is design to expose you to the major components of a corporate turnaround.

  • Understanding basic concepts of international marketing. Understanding and managing heterogeneous, dynamic, and interdependent environments across countries. How to develop and implement an international marketing strategy: where and how to compete, how to adapt your marketing mix.

  • In this class, students will broaden their understanding of sustainability and how it applies to energy-related businesses and products, learn about why sustainability offers business opportunity , and learn to analyze the economic, social, cultural, and political limitations that might affect the implementation and sustainability of technologies/products/businesses. Students will expand their potential as a leader in sustainable business.

  • Multi-Channel Marketing strategies empower managers to create value for different customer segments. This class covers the necessary concepts to evaluate and select go-to market strategies in order to capitalize on the ubiquity of modern customers.

  • The objective of this course is to provide a working knowledge of the risks and opportunities arising from climate change and climate policy for businesses. This course focuses on how climate change may change the way we do business, looking at the physical, operational and financial impact of climate change, as well as the emerging tools to foster business resilience.

  • The course plans to focus on the finance principles related to the risk and return of the private equity (PE) industry, valuation of PE target companies, the structuring of leveraged buyouts (LBOs), and the management of portfolio companies.

Commands

Twitter Feed

Loading tweets...